Union Wireless
sepia tone photo of a young man

Pictured Top: Howard Woody as a young man.

From Humble Beginnings

The Union Telephone Company was founded in 1914 by John D Woody, in the small town of Mountain View, in Wyoming’s Bridger Valley.

Mr. Woody dreamed of connecting the residents of Bridger Valley - with each other, and with the outside world. The service grew from a humble start of stringing farmer lines across barbed wire fence posts to connect neighboring ranches to the creation of a handful of local telephone exchanges, connecting communities in the valley.

The technology was in its infancy, and Union provided the first-ever telephone service to its customers. For those early customers, it was life-changing. They could call a doctor in an emergency, and, instead of spending the better part of a day travelling, call to order a part or check in on a distant neighbor in real-time.

A Family Affair

When John’s son, Howard Woody, took on the leadership role at Union, he embraced the same single-minded commitment to providing phone service - but across a much larger swath of Wyoming. In some cases, Howard’s desire to provide telephone service to individuals in remote areas resulted in the company losing money. But to Howard, like his father before him, the desire to help people communicate was paramount.

In the early days, the company struggled, but under Howard Woody’s leadership the landline customer base grew, and the company became profitable. This success is all the more laudable when viewed against an American landscape littered with hundreds of failed telecoms unable to adapt and invest in new technology as the telephone industry evolved.

Four rugged men in Western attire

Above: From left to right Lee Woody, Howard Woody, John Woody, Jim Woody

sepia tone photo of a young man

Pictured Top: Howard Woody as a young man.

From Humble Beginnings

The Union Telephone Company was founded in 1914 by John D Woody, in the small town of Mountain View, in Wyoming’s Bridger Valley.

Mr. Woody dreamed of connecting the residents of Bridger Valley - with each other, and with the outside world. The service grew from a humble start of stringing farmer lines across barbed wire fence posts to connect neighboring ranches to the creation of a handful of local telephone exchanges, connecting communities in the valley.

The technology was in its infancy, and Union provided the first-ever telephone service to its customers. For those early customers, it was life-changing. They could call a doctor in an emergency, and, instead of spending the better part of a day traveling, call to order a part or check in on a distant neighbor in real-time.

Four rugged men in Western attire

Above: From left to right Lee Woody, Howard Woody, John Woody, Jim Woody

A Family Affair

When John’s son, Howard Woody, took on the leadership role at Union, he embraced the same single-minded commitment to providing phone service - but across a much larger swath of Wyoming. In some cases, Howard’s desire to provide telephone service to individuals in remote areas resulted in the company losing money. But to Howard, like his father before him, the desire to help people communicate was paramount.

In the early days, the company struggled, but under Howard Woody’s leadership the landline customer base grew, and the company became profitable. This success is all the more laudable when viewed against an American landscape littered with hundreds of failed telecoms unable to adapt and invest in new technology as the telephone industry evolved.


Union Today ~ Four Generations in, Still a Family Passion

Today, Union has 18 landline telephone exchange areas covering 7,400 square miles in Wyoming, Utah, and Colorado. Union’s wireless service covers those same territories and beyond. Union's broadband internet network has surpassed 1,000 miles of fiber in the ground, with service from Pinedale to Saratoga to Manila, Utah.

Still family-owned, the fourth generation of the Woody family guide Union today from its headquarters, which is still based in Mountain View, Wyoming.

With 273 employees, many military veterans among them, Union also has 10 retail locations. All told, Union serves over 40,000 landline, wireless and broadband customers.